Art

Art

  • Thomas Hirschhorn

    A World of Collage

    Swiss artist Thomas Hirschhorn juxtaposes pixelated images from the media. His works are not about technology, says the artist: “I try to give form to what I can’t accept: that someone else can decide for me what I should do, see or think.”

  • Karin Mamma Andersson

    Paintings as Weapons

    “It is the psyche of the artist that is the product, it sprung from your own well, it’s your own water,” says Sweden’s great painter Karin Mamma Andersson in this portrait. “The moment you dig into something, it becomes a sort of self-image.”

  • Daniel Richter

    On Vienna vs. Berlin

    “As ‘a working tourist’ in Vienna you see all these smells of the past and not all of them are disgusting.” Hear why German painter Daniel Richter prefers Vienna – where he works as professor at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste Wien – over Berlin.

  • 5 Artists

    on Making Sculptures

    “All sculpture that I’m interested in knows that death is the inevitable conclusion.” Award-winning artist Antony Gormley sees art as the expression and generation of hope. Hear how he and five other artists work with sculpture.

  • Dan Graham

    Advice to the Young

    “Don’t make art as a career,” says award-winning American artist Dan Graham. “Because that means you’re just doing the same boring things that you reacted against in the beginning.”

  • Gerhard Richter

    In Art We Find Beauty and Comfort

    “I don’t really believe art has power. But it does have value. Those who take an interest in it find solace in art. It gives them huge comfort.” Gerhard Richter, one of the greatest painters of our time, discusses beauty in the era of the internet.

  • Joan Jonas

    Advice to the Young

    “Love what you do. Because it’s not easy. It’s not easy to make art.” Watch as the iconic video and performance artist Joan Jonas advises her younger colleagues to enjoy what they’re doing as you never know how people will respond to your work.

  • Catherine Opie

    A World Beyond Selfies

    “I was never an optimist in thinking that my images would change laws. But I certainly thought that I would be able to create a history.” Catherine Opie, photographer of minority groups and subcultures, can be both political and very internal.

  • Bill Viola

    Cameras are Soul Keepers

    When video artist Bill Viola was 6 years old he fell into a lake, all the way to the bottom, to a place which seemed like paradise. "There's more than just the surface of life." Viola explains. "The real things are under the surface".

  • Karin Mamma Andersson

    Advice to the Young

    “If you think Rubens is crap, then don’t bother with him.” Swedish artist Karin Mamma Andersson advises young painters to learn their art history: “Focus on what you find interesting, but immerse yourself in it.”

  • 8 Artists

    on Water

    Water covers 70 per cent of the earth’s surface. “It’s always the same and it’s never the same,” says Finnish artist Elina Brotherus. Hear her, Olafur Eliasson, Bill Viola, Marina Abramović and four other artists on the vital substance.

  • Jonathan Monk

    An Original Twist

    “I’m sure even the cavemen copied the drawings of the guys from the next village and changed them a little bit.” Hear British conceptual artist Jonathan Monk’s view on the idea of originality: “Just embrace that you’re not. Or twist it so you can be.”

  • Terry Winters

    Unintended Things to Happen

    In a culture full of digital images and copies, painting is a “singular lens with the capacity to reflect an individual’s vision,” says American artist Terry Winters. Hear how he applies a “painterly approach” to his work with printmaking and drawing.

  • Nobuo Sekine

    Sensibility of a Rock

    “I create works with the perspective of admiration for nature. I believe that my job is to convey the richness of nature to viewers.” Japanese artist Nobuo Sekine’s sculptures defy gravity. Learn how he got the idea to elevate a rock – and make it fly.

  • Gardar Eide Einarsson

    The Violence Under the Surface

    “I’ve lost the youthful naivety that leads me to think authorities should be torn down. I see it as an on-going negotiation.” Norwegian-born Gardar Eide Einarsson, who is now based in Tokyo, knows first-hand how different societies deal with authority.

  • 6 Artists

    on Their Parents

    When Bill Viola’s mother died it gave him an artistic breakthrough, David Shrigley’s parents wondered why people would pay for his art, Jonathan Meese’s works as her son's assistant, and Yayoi Kusama escaped her parents to become an artist.

  • Taryn Simon

    Where the Secret Goes

    Like a spy, American artist Taryn Simon uncovers the hidden places of the USA, portraying her country through its foundational spaces: religion, security, law. Like the country itself, the meaning, says Simon, is “ever morphing.”

  • Wura-Natasha Ogunji

    The Kissing Mask

    “Kissing can be so many things…a way of connection that is purely about recognising another person’s humanity, divinity and essence.” Meet artist Wura-Natasha Ogunji, who sees performance as a way to witness and transcend the flaws of human nature.

  • Ragnar Kjartansson

    on Stage with his Mother

    The "mother with child" is one of the oldest clichés in the art historical vocabulary. Performance artist Ragnar Kjartansson grew up in the theatre with an actress-mother who attuned him to what he calls "the realness of fakeness."

  • Cathrine Raben Davidsen

    Paintings of Loss

    Artist Cathrine Raben Davidsen was only 13 years old when she lost her father. “I started making art because I lacked words. Art was my way of dealing with loss.” Meet an artist whose work is a meditation on loss, both personal and societal.

  • 8 Artists on Sound

    Captivating, agonizing, nostalgic – sound can induce a plethora of experiences. In video artist Bill Viola’s words: “like angels, sound can cross between the physical and the nonphysical world.” Hear how he and 7 other artists inhabit the sonic world.

  • Carlos Cruz-Diez

    The Colours We Create

    “I always say that I do not make paintings or sculptures, I make support for events.” Follow Carlos Cruz-Diez, leading figure in Op Art since the 1960s, into a world of chromatic experience.

  • Carlos Cruz-Diez

    Advice to the Young

    Franco-Venezuelan artist Carloz Cruz-Diez has a lifetime of advice saved up for young artists – even though they may not want to listen. “They should do what I did: try to invent art and new discourses.”

  • Ann Veronica Janssens

    Passion for Light

    Step into the laboratory of an artist whose main material is light. Whether solid, liquid or gaseous Ann Veronica Janssens uses light in all its forms “to show the manifestations of reality in a different way.”

  • Athi-Patra Ruga

    A Glimpse of Utopia

    “Somehow resistance is what validates an identity. Growing up gay, black and non-Christian, it kind of is something I love playing with.” Athi-Patra Ruga's sensuous work makes us question everyday life.

  • Alex Da Corte & Jørgen Leth

    Eminem and Warhol

    Two American icons portrayed eating. Young Alex Da Corte, who impersonated Eminem for a year, was inspired by film director Jørgen Leth, who made an iconic scene with Andy Warhol. Here they meet on stage to talk about the stunning parallels.

  • Daniel Richter

    A German Painter

    “The studio is the sponge and the outside world is the water … The sponge is dipped into reality and then squeezed out.” Daniel Richter, one of the most important painters of his generation, talks about the transformative power of painting.

  • Tiffany Chung

    Maps of Memory

    One of the biggest political and social issues of our time is the refugee crisis. Meet Vietnamese-American artist Tiffany Chung who uses questions of migration, conflict and cultural memory as the raw material for her art.

  • David Shrigley

    Everything that is Bad About Art

    "One tends to think of oneself as being somewhat more functional and dynamic than one actually is.” Join the incomparable David Shrigley for a thorough and humorous talk about making art that some people think is absolute rubbish.

  • Joshua Oppenheimer

    Making the Invisible Visible

    "You have to find the traces of fear and silence that are visible, whether it's in the furrow of someone's brow or in the water as it flows down an aging torso." Joshua Oppenheimer talks about the making of his Oscar-nominated documentaries.

  • Cécile B. Evans

    The Virtual is Real

    “I just don’t believe in the word ‘virtual’,” says artist Cécile B. Evans and argues that in today’s society, where drones are used for warfare and romantic relationships begin online we can no longer distinguish between the so-called real and the virtual.

  • Ragnar Kjartansson & Mother

    On ’Me and My Mother’

    Every five years, artist Ragnar Kjartansson asks his mother to spit on him for several minutes in front of a camera. The Icelandic mother and son here discuss the fascinating performance, which Kjartansson argues has become “like a part of our family life.”

  • William Kentridge

    Reduced to Being an Artist

    ”One can always write ones biography in the terms of the failures which have saved you.” Meet South African artist William Kentridge in this extensive and humorous reflection upon life and his relationship with art.

  • Alex Da Corte and Ed Atkins

    In Conversation

    “My vote is for incoherence.” We brought together two young artists, who have taken the art world by storm. Experience Alex Da Corte and Ed Atkins in this video where they talk about each other’s video works and their contexts.

  • Joshua Oppenheimer

    Why Do We Watch Non-Fiction?

    Watch Joshua Oppenheimer – the director behind award-winning documentaries such as ‘The Act of Killing’ and ‘The Look of Silence’ – comment on non-fiction’s power to intervene by presenting a different story than the official one.

  • Wura-Natasha Ogunji

    Beauty in the Streets of Lagos

    Performance and visual artist Wura-Natasha Ogunji here shares her intense experience with the four-hour performance ‘Beauty’, where she and a group of other women have their hair braided together in a public space in Lagos, Nigeria.

  • Doug Aitken

    The Conditions We Live Under

    “To reflect the present in a new way is to me one of the goals of creating things.” The iconic artist and filmmaker Doug Aitken here discusses the unique and valuable time we’re living in now, which forces us to innovate how we work – and survive.

  • John Baldessari

    Art is who I am

    “I never liked to be called a Los Angeles artist.” Meet conceptual artist John Baldessari, who many describe as a cultural symbol and the grandmaster of the Los Angeles art scene. “My perception of the city is very ugly. But that’s attractive too. It’s very seductive.”

  • Manal Al Dowayan

    Protecting Words

    “The written word is about engaging the viewer.” Let us introduce you to the cool Saudi Arabian artist Manal Al Dowayan, who here shares why she has chosen to integrate words into her art – and why they are so powerful.

  • Laurie Anderson

    A Life of Storytelling

    Listen to the story of how Laurie Anderson became the iconic multimedia artist she is today, why she prefers to keep things simple, and how she began telling stories as a child – and never stopped: “I try to make stories that really engage my mind.”

  • Laurie Anderson

    Advice to the Young

    “Be loose!” The legendary multimedia artist, musician and film director Laurie Anderson puts it as simply and clearly as that when she here advises artists to avoid being pressured into limiting themselves artistically.

  • Laurie Anderson

    Letter Exchange with JFK

    “Dear Senator Kennedy. I really admire the way you’re running your campaign. I’m running for president of my student council, can you send me some tips?” Find out what the soon-to-be president John F. Kennedy replied to a young Laurie Anderson’s letter.

  • Doug Aitken

    The Nomadic Studio

    In this interview featuring extracts from Doug Aitken’s visually stunning videos, the American multimedia artist offers insight into his captivating work and how he learns from “watching things become a car crash in slow motion.”

  • Joshua Oppenheimer

    Advice to the Young

    “Don’t listen to anyone who tells you how it should be done.” The commended American director Joshua Oppenheimer – nominated twice for an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature – here shares his powerful advice for aspiring filmmakers.

  • Margarethe von Trotta

    A Group of Rebels

    Award-winning film director Margarethe von Trotta – who has worked closely with the legendary directors Fassbinder and Schlöndorff – here shares the story of her winding road to becoming one of the leading contemporary German filmmakers.

  • Anna Bjerger

    It's All About Process

    “The painting moves me forward – and I follow.” Meet Swedish Anna Bjerger, who wants to preserve the excitement of painting, and who paints from photographs, feeling that she can somehow rescue images “that would otherwise disappear.”

  • 3 Artists

    On Yayoi Kusama’s Phalli’s Field

    An absorbing installation of mirrors and soft polka dots by Yayoi Kusama. Join artists Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen, Astrid Svangren and Alexander Tovborg as they explore what Kusama herself describes as “a sublime, miraculous field of phalluses.”

  • David Shrigley

    Advice to the Young

    “You’re on the right track if you’re excited about what you’re doing.” David Shrigley, known for his humorous spin on common situations, here advises his colleagues to be open to learning from mistakes and stresses that being an artist “isn’t for everybody.”

  • A K Dolven

    Looking for Balance

    Join us for a visit in A K Dolven’s studio in London, where we talked to the Norwegian artist about her inspirations and a selection of her diverse artwork: “Art is not about the painting itself. It’s about the world outside the painting.”

  • Joan Jonas

    Layers of Time

    Joan Jonas is considered a pioneer of video and performance art. The legendary American artist here offers insight into the creation and themes – such as feminism and environmental changes – of a selection of her intriguing video installations.

  • 6 Artists

    On Black Identity

    “Where am I in this story?” Watch artists such as Wangechi Mutu, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and Chimamanda Adichie discuss how black people are (mis-)represented in today’s society and culture.

  • Michael Simpson

    Odyssey of a Painter

    “I’ll tell you what I did feel when I was a younger man: I felt kind of sexy. It has something to do with the sensuality of painting.” British Michael Simpson invited us into his studio space, where he shared the story of his journey as a painter.

  • Imran Qureshi

    The Violence Affecting Us All

    Meet one of the most important figures on Pakistan’s art scene today – Imran Qureshi. He here discusses his visually stunning artwork, which centres on the recurrent and universal theme of violence: “Violence is not a strange thing for anybody in the world.”

  • Catherine Opie

    Portrait Through a Home

    “All of a sudden we find the human in her because there’s a dog eared remote control manual on her bedside table.” American photographer Catherine Opie here shows and talks about her captivating series of photographs from Elizabeth Taylor’s home.

  • Pascale Marthine Tayou

    School of Clowns

    “I think that children, who are more innocent, are better at wearing their masks than us adults.” In this video the Cameroonian born artist Pascale Marthine Tayou discusses his fascinating work, including his photographic series ‘L’Ecole des Clowns’.

  • Sterling Ruby

    A Bowl of Memories

    “If I had to describe it to your grandmother, it is like a big bowl or ashtray filled with all of the debris from the past.” Meet American artist Sterling Ruby, whom we interviewed in his Los Angeles studio about his unique work made from ceramic “shrapnel.”

  • Mark Bradford

    Layers of Violence

    “I pillage my own work. I tear it down and build it up in traces.” Let us introduce you to American painter Mark Bradford, who doesn’t use traditional paint but material “that has something to do with the social fabric of the times we live in.”

  • Anna Bjerger

    The Magic Moment

    Join us as we visit painter Anna Bjerger at her home in Sweden, where she talks about how she paints from old, anonymous photographs, and what that means for her as an artist: “You can’t fake it. You’ve got to have genuine feeling for this image.”

  • Michael Simpson

    Advice to the Young

    “Don’t be afraid of the history of art.” We had the pleasure of meeting painter Michael Simpson in his studio. He here shares his solid piece of advice for young artists, who should learn from the history of art rather than dismiss it as something outdated.

  • Fred Tomaselli

    Drawing on New York Times

    “The world is going to hell, but art is still worth making.” Hear about American artist Fred Tomaselli’s fascinating project, in which he manipulates The New York Times front pages by adding paint and collage onto editorial photographs.

  • Doug Aitken

    The Sculpture as a Flux

    Watch American multimedia artist Doug Aitken talk about his mesmerizing, glowing phone booth-piece ‘Twilight’ – a “living sculpture,” which creates “a synthesis between work and viewer.”

  • Nicolai Howalt

    What We Become

    Photographer Nicolai Howalt here takes us through a selection of his spellbinding work, including photos of young boxers before and after their first match, abandoned car accidents and starry formations of ashes left behind after a cremation.

  • Superflex

    You Can't Eat Identity

    Danish artists Superflex confront the idea of Europe in their visually beautiful but disturbing and eye-opening film ‘Kwassa Kwassa’, which deals with the dangerous journey between two islands, one of them located in the outermost region of the EU.

  • Sislej Xhafa

    Art is an Emergency

    Kosovar Albanian artist Sislej Xhafa is known for his powerful way of challenging the social and political reality. He here discusses one of his poignant installations, which consists of the belongings of drowned migrants found at the coast of Lampedusa.

  • David Altmejd

    The Heart is a Werewolf

    “When I make a sculpture, I don’t want to control it intellectually. I want it to create its own intelligence.” Meet the artist behind a huge enigmatic and almost sci-fi like sculpture where a crystalizing werewolf functions like ‘a heart’.

  • Superflex

    Why We Flooded McDonald’s

    What motivates a Danish artists' group to make a movie where one of the most famous American fast food restaurants is inexplicably flooded? Superflex here comment on the content of their “post-apocalyptic movie” ‘Flooded McDonald’s’.

  • Ingvar Cronhammar

    Where Language Stops

    Join us on an aesthetically invigorating tour through an old 4,320 square metre water reservoir, which was turned into a stirring installation of light, water and music. Meet the unconventional artist behind it, Ingvar Cronhammar.

  • 6 Artists

    Poetry of Discarded Materials

    In a time where consumerism only seems to be growing, it is inspiring to observe these six artists – such as Tara Donovan and Piet Hein Eek – who have made discarded, everyday materials the centre of their work. Watch their approach to re-using materials.

  • Nicolai Howalt

    The Light Eyes Can’t See

    Experience an unusual take on the sun in this video where artist Nicolai Howalt talks about his “anarchistic investigation” of light and the sun. An intriguing project inspired by the Danish Nobel Prize-winning physician Niels Finsen’s work with light radiation.

  • 8 Artists

    Light of the Night

    Late night reading. Photographing by the light of the moon. Finding a beautiful world at the dark bottom of a lake. The mystery of the night and of darkness attracts the eight artists featured in this video – and for very different reasons. Discover them here.

  • 7 Artists

    On the Arctic

    Follow us to one of the most fascinating yet endangered places on Earth. While politicians discuss climate change, we have asked seven artists about their relation to and work within the Arctic. Hear their stories ranging from divine silence to dark threats.

  • Fred Tomaselli

    Advice to the Young

    “You might as well be true to what you want to do and not turn art into another day job.” Watch Fred Tomaselli, a master of psychedelic artwork, advise artists to create their own art world instead of waiting for the established art scene to discover them.

  • Fred Tomaselli

    Reflecting the Unreal

    “The hippie dream was coming to an end.” Watch American artist Fred Tomaselli – who adds elements such as pot and pills to his work – discuss the impact psychedelic drugs had on his art and how it reflects escapism while still commenting on reality.

  • Dario Fo

    I am a Born Storyteller

    Meet legendary playwright Dario Fo, who here tells the intriguing story of how he became a storyteller and how he revolutionized theatre by “destroying the fourth wall” – encouraging his audience not to be voyeurs but to participate.

  • Dario Fo

    We Need to Intervene

    Nobel Prize recipient Dario Fo is one of the most widely performed contemporary playwrights and a well-known social critic. The 89-year-old Italian here bluntly shares his opinion about today’s corrupted Italy and theatre’s crucial role in presenting the truth.

  • Thomas Zipp

    Everybody is a Freak

    “I believe that everybody is a freak in a way. That’s what we have to accept.” Come along into the dark, uncanny – and yet humorous – world of Berlin-based artist Thomas Zipp. He here talks about letting go of ‘normality’ and the inherent potential of art.

  • Cecily Brown

    Take No Prisoners

    Cecily Brown is considered a central figure in the resurgence of painting at the turn of the century. We met the British painter at her New York studio for a talk about borrowing imagery from other artists, and how she has always responded to dark, scary art.

  • Not Vital

    Moments You Never Forget

    Swiss artist Not Vital is an intriguing example of how the gap between art and architecture is narrowing. The artist, who is renowned for his unorthodox architectural structures around the world, here describes how his projects derive from moments in his own life.

  • Mania Akbari

    Robber of Reality

    Mania Akbari has made films that have upset the religious establishment in Iran, and as a result she lives in exile. But this has not prevented her from continuing to make her controversial films. Watch her talk about being a filmmaker in this extensive interview.

  • John Armleder

    In Front of the Blank Sheet

    Art begins with ‘a blank sheet’, but how do artists deal with it? Meet John Armleder, one of the most influential Swiss artists of his generation, who here discusses the connotations of the blank sheet and compares the process of making art to dancing.

  • Colm Tóibín

    On Giacometti

    Watch as the award-winning Irish writer Colm Tóibín shares his thoughts on Giacometti’s iconic ‘Homme qui marche’. A timeless and inspirational sculpture, which has been interpreted as a wish to come to terms with the Second World War.

  • Yvette Brackman

    A Sense of Togetherness

    “There’s nothing about an art space that says you’re not included.” Meet the praised American artist Yvette Brackman, whose captivating artwork echoes her somewhat split upbringing as the all-American child of Russian Jewish dissidents.

  • Hans-Peter Feldmann

    It's Always About Women

    “80 per cent of artists are dealing with mother issues.” In this personal interview the internationally praised German artist Hans-Peter Feldmann muses on the magnetic power of women, and shares how he has used art as both escape and therapy.

  • Yayoi Kusama

    Advice to the Young

    What piece of advice would one of the world’s most iconic contemporary artists pass on? Japanese Yayoi Kusama here turns the tables and argues that advice should not come from other people: “I am not an art teacher to you.”

  • Yayoi Kusama

    Let's Fight Together

    Welcome to the magical, polka-dotted, pumpkin-filled world of the legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, who uses her art to fight for love and peace. We had the pleasure of meeting the 86-year-old Kusama in her colourful Tokyo-studio.

  • Morten Søndergaard

    A Pharmacy of Words

    “Pronouns© have severe side effects.” Watch one of Denmark’s most thrilling poets, Morten Søndergaard, discuss his fascinating and humorous project ‘Wordpharmacy’, which takes grammar to a new level by combining it with medicine.

  • Yehudit Sasportas

    Swamp of the Subconscious

    Find out how a picture of a swamp became significant for the acclaimed Israeli artist Yehudit Sasportas. She here discusses a selection of her work, and argues that finding the images that inspire is a matter of following your subconsciousness.

  • Jake and Dinos Chapman

    Offending Taste

    Watch the artist duo with a flair for the bizarre, Jake and Dinos Chapman, on moulding set symbols into something quite surprising, how Ronald McDonald ended up becoming a pariah, and why they prefer to offend rather than create taste.

  • Ryan Gander

    Honest as Children

    Meet internationally acclaimed conceptual artist Ryan Gander, who in this interview explains why the honesty of children is his biggest source of inspiration: “It’s almost like a child is a microcosm of the perfect spectator-spectacle relationship.”

  • The Story of Jonas Mekas

    We had the unique pleasure of meeting the great avant-garde filmmaker Jonas Mekas, who never goes anywhere without his camera. Mekas here shares his fascinating personal story and shows us around his workspace in Brooklyn, New York.

  • Jonas Mekas

    Advice to the Young

    The godfather of American avant-garde cinema, filmmaker and poet Jonas Mekas, whom we met in his Brooklyn-home, has a clear piece of advice for aspiring filmmakers: “Don’t go to film school. Get a camera.”

  • Mania Akbari

    Beauty and Aggression

    Meet Mania Akbari, who is considered one of the most controversial filmmakers in Iran due to the themes she deals with, such as infidelity and homosexuality. Here she reflects on how something poetic can be found in even the fiercest dictatorship.

  • Erik A. Frandsen

    Drawing Out Memories

    Distinguished Danish artist Erik A. Frandsen here shares how the trance-like experience of a 35 days and 1,050-kilometre long walk was transferred into a stunning exhibition of multi-coloured mosaic columns and beautiful watercolour sketches.

  • Christien Meindertsma

    Design With a Conscience

    “That was my second reason to start following a pig.” Christien Meindertsma, a young star of Dutch design, here discusses some of her unique socially conscious projects such as a book charting products made from a pig and making sweaters with a personal story.

  • Joachim Koester

    A Dark Sea of Awareness

    Danish artist Joachim Koester discusses his acclaimed black-and-white film from 2009, which wordlessly investigates the legendary American author Carlos Castaneda’s idea that a certain set of exercises can help us “navigate the dark sea of awareness.”

  • Sammy Baloji

    The Past in Front of Us

    Through his intriguing and poignant pictures, Congolese artist and photographer Sammy Baloji confronts the Western portrayal of his country by linking old photographs from Belgian colonial times with contemporary ones. The result is captivating.

  • Christien Meindertsma

    The Illusion of Safety

    Does increased security make you feel safer? Cool Dutch designer and artist Christien Meindertsma investigates this issue in her compelling art book ’Checked Baggage’, which comprises a week’s worth of objects confiscated in Schiphol Airport after 9/11.

  • Susan Hiller

    Advice to the Young

    Too many people think that you can only be creative within the field of art: “It’s not just a little ghetto called ‘art’ that allows you to do that.” Internationally acclaimed artist Susan Hiller advises younger colleagues not to make art unless they have to.

  • Susan Hiller

    Stories from the Other Side

    A cascade of voices belonging to people who have been declared physically dead, but lived to tell the story, comes together in a ghostlike installation of 104 screens. Experience the intriguing art installation by the influential American artist Susan Hiller.

  • Alex Da Corte

    Dancing Around Delusion

    “Art was like sex.” Alex Da Corte is a rising star on the international art scene – his artistic expression a mixture of pop art and a strong personal story. We spent a day with him in his neighborhood in Philadelphia to talk about his creative journey.

  • Hans-Peter Feldmann

    Advice to the Young

    German artist Hans-Peter Feldmann advises young artists to always follow the path they themselves feel is the right one – however strange or fruitless it seems: “Chasing after false idols or role models is always a dead end.”

  • Jake and Dinos Chapman

    Hitler Turning in his Grave

    Death threats from neo-Nazis was just one of the many extreme responses to the English artist duo Jake and Dinos Chapman’s controversial and much debated exhibition of modified watercolours by Hitler. Hear their thoughts on the divisive project.

  • Wangechi Mutu

    On The End of eating Everything

    Kenyan-born artist Wangechi Mutu, whom we met in her Brooklyn studio, here discusses her powerful animated short film ‘The End of eating Everything’ – a strong comment on how we disrespect the earth in our contemporary culture.

  • Jeff Wall

    We are all Actors

    An enjoyable and philosophical conversation between the pioneering Canadian photographer Jeff Wall and Belgian Wall expert Thierry de Duve about how Wall works with people, places and variations of beauty.

  • Jeff Wall

    Pictures Like Poems

    Discover what inspires and motivates one of the modern masters of photography, Canadian Jeff Wall, who here discusses a selection of his impressive photographs and their often meticulous compositions.

  • Three Artists

    On a Spider by Bourgeois

    A ginormous 30 feet high spider would scare the life out of most of us. In this video three artists share their diverse feelings towards the spider sculpture made by French artist Louise Bourgeois – as a tribute to her mother.

  • Klara Hobza

    On Diving Through Europe

    In her grand art endeavor ‘Diving Through Europe’, Berlin-based Klara Hobza investigates the boundaries of what is conceivable by diving the European rivers, stretching from the North Sea to the Black Sea in the course of 20-30 years.

  • Jannis Kounellis

    Gray is the Color of Our Time

    Take a look behind Greek artist Jannis Kounellis’ raw and powerful work: “There’s no distance between me and the dialogue established years ago, which sees man as the centre. That’s what compels me to create art all the time, every day.”

  • Wangechi Mutu

    Cultural Cutouts

    Kenyan artist Wangechi Mutu uses her colourful artwork to confront the missing attention to black women within society: “It’s kind of an ironic thing that I’m producing that image out of the very lack of it.”

  • Per Bak Jensen

    The Presence of the Absent

    We met Danish photographer Per Bak Jensen for a talk about desirable ‘hidden things’, and how photographing the world helps him understand it – and himself: “I can’t describe it in words. So instead I’ve chosen to photograph it.”

  • Meriç Algün Ringborg

    Absurd Questions

    ‘Have you ever been declared judicially incompetent?’ Turkish artist Meriç Algün Ringborg uses her own surreal experience as an immigrant in her challenging art, which confronts the bureaucracy of immigration.

  • Thomas Bangsted

    Rotary Obstacles

    “For me to get involved with a new picture, it has to suggest a sense of impossibility at the outset.” Danish photographer, Thomas Bangsted, discloses how photographic obstacles is his great source of inspiration.

  • Thomas Bangsted

    A Photographic Puzzle

    Danish photographer Thomas Bangsted spends months, even years, completing a single picture, creating what he describes as ‘photographic puzzles’. Come along as we follow him on a quest for the ideal setting.

  • Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen

    Performing Seven Songs

    A goddess, a Marlene Dietrich character, a veiled woman. Meet performance artist Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen, who addresses dilemmas of modern life through disguises.

  • Danh Vo

    A Question of Freedom

    “Personally I think the icon of the Statue of Liberty has been raped enough, too many people have been claiming whatever stupidity on what freedom might or might not be,” says artist Danh Vo in this interview about his sculptural piece, ‘We the People’.

  • Anselm Kiefer

    Art is Spiritual

    Meet the extolled German artist, Anselm Kiefer, who lives for the process of creating, argues that history is a moldable material, considers art a spiritual occupation and refers to himself as a “dinosaur”.

  • 12 Artists

    On Childhood

    “Most artists have terrible childhoods”. Meet 12 exceptional contemporary artists who reflect upon their early years and how it shaped their life and art.

  • 8 Artists

    Advice to the Young

    Watch, listen and soak in the words of 8 prominent artists, who have strong and diverse thoughts on what constitutes insightful advice to young artists.

  • Olafur Eliasson

    The Shape of an Idea

    The space that ideas stem from is similar to a treasure room, according to artist Olafur Eliasson, who here discusses his remarkable art installation ‘Model Room’.

  • Guido van der Werve

    Simplicity of the Sublime

    It was when he lived in hectic New York, that Dutch filmmaker, video artist and sports aficionado, Guido van der Werve, became acutely aware of his artistic need to seek out simplicity - and to be bored.

  • Robert Longo

    I am an Image Thief

    Does copying other prominent artists such as Jackson Pollock really make you an artist? Find out in our interview with American painter Robert Longo, who calls himself an image thief.

  • Olafur Eliasson

    Advice to the Young

    “Artists should have confidence in the fact that making a drawing is changing the world.” Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson, here presents his strong and personal advice to young artists.

  • Olafur Eliasson

    A Riverbed Inside the Museum

    Like lava from a volcano, Olafur Eliasson’s fascinating installation ‘Riverbed’ runs through the Danish Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. The highly praised artist here shares his intriguing thoughts behind the installation.

  • Ian McKeever

    Mystery to the Viewer

    “I am trying to take the sense of speed out of the visual world of looking.” Interview with renowned British artist, Ian McKeever.

  • Wim Wenders

    Painter Filmmaker Photographer

    “The world was such a better world in paintings than in reality.” Through paintings German filmmaker Wim Wenders discovered the possibility of a different world, and this would later come to define him as a filmmaker and photographer.

  • Wim Wenders

    Advice to the Young

    “Do what nobody else can do except for you.” Such is the unflagging advice from German filmmaker Wim Wenders, who in this video gives us his take on how to become a successful artist.

  • Richard Serra

    On 'Porten i slugten'

    Richard Serra is one of the world's most significant sculptors. In this video Serra presents one piece and reveals how he approaches an assignment in order to create the extraordinary experience for the viewer, which is his trademark.

  • Keith Tyson

    A Pattern of Mystery

    When British artist Keith Tyson was 13 years old he took apart his computer and “it was a complete mystery how it worked.” Even though he understood programming, the interconnectedness of everything was like a labyrinth.

  • Keith Tyson

    Art in a Coffee Cup

    ”To understand a coffee cup, you would have to understand the entire universe.” Meet British artist Keith Tyson, who here explains the interconnectedness of existence through a coffee cup.

  • Adrian Paci

    Moments of Transition

    "The artist offers visions. He imagines things. It's about how the experience of the world is feeding the language and how this language becomes part of the world." Interview with Albanian video-artist Adrian Paci about his work and how he views the world.

  • Jørgen Haugen Sørensen

    Art Sees Through Society

    ”Sometimes I wonder if mankind is the happiest when it kills. Whether we are some sort of castrated mankind that has learned to tame itself in order to be able to live together.” Meet Danish sculptor Jørgen Haugen Sørensen for a conversation about art, society and the beast within us.

  • Three Writers

    On a Riverbed by Olafur Eliasson

    Ever wondered what 180 tons of Icelandic rocks would look like, filling up a museum of modern art? Follow the acclaimed writers Sjón, James McBride and Daniel Kehlmann, as they take a tour through 'Riverbed', created by Olafur Eliasson.

  • William Kentridge

    Making Sense of the World

    "There is a desperation in all certainty. The category of political uncertainty, philosophical uncertainty, uncertainty of images is much closer to how the world is," says South African artist William Kentridge in this video presenting his work.

  • Dan Colen

    From Bad Boy to Favorite Son

    "We were really running wild and we spent a lot of time shutting the world out." American artist Dan Colen looks back upon his collaboration with fellow artists Ryan McGinley and Dash Snow at a time when they were "destroying rooms" while thinking "we are not hurting anything."

  • Paterson & Atwood

    Future Library

    Come take a walk in the forest with Scottish artist Katie Paterson, who tells us about her artwork Future Library. And meets world famous writer Margaret Atwood, who will write this future library's first story, not to be published for 100 years.

  • Darren Almond

    The Landscape of the Night

    The landscape of the night is like a Jackson Pollock painting - you know it's a Pollock straight away. You can read every mark within miliseconds, you feel the void, there is this calmness, that comes upon you. Interview with British artist Darren Almond about his series of full moon pictures.

  • Daniel Richter

    On Emil Nolde

    Emil Nolde was a Nazi - and so what, asks contemporary German artist Daniel Richter. "It's a moralistic debate. A debate, that mirrors the moralism and bigottery of a generation that seems to think, that the world is a moral playground."

  • Sarah Sze

    The Meaning Between Things

    ”A sculpture is constantly growing and dying at the same time. It is a parallel process of construction and deconstruction.” Meet contemporary artist Sarah Sze in her New York studio.

  • Jørgen Leth

    Warhol Eating a Hamburger

    Let acclaimed film director Jørgen Leth take you through the iconic scene with Andy Warhol eating a hamburger from his film '66 Scenes from America'.

  • Thomas Demand

    A World of Models

    We realize how the world looks through models, says German artist Thomas Demand in this interview. And we live with models all the time - in science, media, even the weather-forecast is a model. Without models, we would go mad within seconds.

  • Peter Laugesen

    Burning Signals of Two Painters

    "Artists have to be like victims on the stakes, sending signals through the flames". Follow the burning signals of Asger Jorn and Jackson Pollock through the eyes of Danish poet, Peter Laugesen.

  • Shirin Neshat

    The Power Behind the Veil

    "Nothing is ever beautiful without some disturbance or violence. That is why the melancholy of my works is so familiar to people." Interview with the Iranian artist Shirin Neshat.

  • David Hockney

    Lost Knowledge

    British artist David Hockney talks about the hidden role of photography in art history and the problem of preserving human knowledge in the digital age.

  • Phyllida Barlow

    An Age of Fallen Monuments

    "All our lives are about constantly losing. The moment is always disappearing, like sand between our fingers. So what is it, we are actually left with?," asks British sculptor Phyllida Barlow.

  • benandsebastian

    Museum of Nothing

    In the Museum of Nothing, the presence of absence is on display. And doubt is introduced into history. Because the visitors are asked to fill the voids and gaps of the collection with their own stories, benandsebastian argue.

  • Sebastian Diaz Morales

    Make Your Enemy Your Friend

    In depth portrait of Argentinian video artist Sebastian Diaz Morales who grew up in wild Patagonia where the wind blows 150 km/h. It was the experience of a stranded whale which made Diaz Morales aware of the language of video art.

  • Sebastian Diaz Morales

    Rooms of Buenos Aires

    Come away with us on a magic walk through amazing rooms of Buenos Aires. Argentinian video artist Sebastian Diaz Morales has a man walk through a building that both exists and doesn't exist, in his Jorge Louis Borges inspired video 'Pasajes'.

  • Lene Tranberg

    The Building is a Landscape

    Award winning architect Lene Tranberg takes us to the heart of Copenhagen, Stræderne. Funnily, it is here - in one of the oldest neighbourhoods of the Danish capital - that her idea of modern architecture was formed.

  • Georg Baselitz

    Only in Art the World is Whole

    ”The most intact world is the world of art. Nothing is better or more interesting to me than paintings.” Renowned German artist Georg Baselitz looks back on his life, his roots and inspirations, and considers where he is at today.

  • Georg Baselitz

    My Idol Edvard Munch

    Meet the legendary painter Georg Baselitz in this short interview about his idol Edvard Munch and their mutual interest in psychological mutilation: ”There is a method of drawing through which one recognizes that something isn't right.”

  • Jonathan Meese

    A Soldier Saluting Art

    Can an artist do the 'heil'-salute like the Nazis did during WW2? Artist Jonathan Meese was taken to court in Germany and won the trial. Here the artist explains why it is important to empty symbols of their meaning when fighting political ideology.

  • Aernout Mik

    A Sense of Uncertainty

    There is something going on, something disturbing, and we don’t know what it is. Meet the Dutch video artist Aernout Mik, who often works without sound: "I think the image is sharper, much sharper, without it."

  • Kerry James Marshall

    Paint it Black

    Imagine being seen for who you really are, a central figure in narration. In this powerful interview American artist Kerry James Marshall talks about how he explores the presence and absence of the black figure in art history.

  • Richard Tuttle

    Artists are Like Clouds

    An emotional interview with the award winning post minimalist Richard Tuttle, known for his subtle, intimate works: ”Artists they’re from nature, they come out of nature, they’re like the clouds that just happen.”

  • Lawrence Weiner

    The Means to Answer Questions

    An interview with the legendary conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner about the connection between cruelty, hierarchy and rationality. The artist must ask questions past ordinary logic, he says.

  • Jonathan Meese & his mother

    Mommy and Me are Animals

    German artist & enfant terrible Jonathan Meese is interviewed with the most important person in the world – his 84 year old mother, Brigitte Meese. The two have worked together for 44 years, if you include the years before he became an artist.

  • Bahia Shehab

    Art as a Tool for Change

    "Graffiti is like flowers. They are beautiful, but they don't live long." An interview with Lebanese-Egyptian street-artist Bahia Shehab about the role of art during the Arab spring: "You cannot resist ideas. They can travel into any mind."

  • Anders Ruhwald

    You in Between

    “To me ceramics are almost like an extension of the body.” Anders Ruhwald is among the most noted of a new generation of ceramic artists. In this video he talks about his most significant exhibition to date, 'You in between'.

  • Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen

    A Living Sculpture that Talks

    Growing up an outsider in a rural area of Denmark, do you put on a show, or do you hide yourself? Performance artist Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen tells the story of her life and art, challenging cultural values and transforming pain into new energy.

  • Per Kirkeby

    We Build Upon Ruins

    Find out why this renowned artist destroys his own paintings if they are too beautiful. Watch the acclaimed Danish artist Per Kirkeby on building art upon the ruins of your ideas.

  • Tove Storch

    Reading Blue

    Travel into the deep blue while watching this short video of the meditative performance by the young artist Tove Storch, where thirty-six people turn twenty pages of books containing twenty nuances of blue.

  • 6 Artists

    On Decisive Moments

    6 acclaimed artists reveal a decisive moment in their life – a strong personal experience which became crucial in their development, and in shaping their work as artists.

  • Antony Gormley

    A Tour Around his Studio

    “I don't feel great, I don't feel famous, and I don't really feel British. I'm a mongrel who's just trying to make sense of being alive.” Legendary sculptor Antony Gormley shows us his studio, explaining how his art explores his place in the world.

  • Kirsten Justesen

    My Body, My Gaze

    “This is me. I use my own body. I use my body as a tool. As a surface. As an icon.” Meet the pioneering Scandinavian feminist, artist Kirsten Justesen, who uses her body to sculpt space.

  • Mircea Nicolae

    My Romanian History

    "With this film I messed with other people's lives, mine included," says Romanian artist Mircea Nicolae in this interview about his work, which combines the history of Romania with his personal life story - mixing fact and fiction in order to "show how you feel when you live there for a while."

  • John Kørner

    How We Behave

    ”I take the term 'contemporary art' literally. Art should always deal with the present” says Danish artist John Kørner about his luminous paintings, portraying us as "one big family, regardless of race and age.”

  • Olof Olsson

    Does Bill Gates Like Puns?

    Was Bill Gates too shy to call Windows Gates? Something about language makes Swedish performance artist Olof Olsson uncomfortable. Find out why in this video about language, humor, small pigs and big discoveries.

  • Superflex

    A Cool Urban Space

    "Let’s meet on the red square.” The artists behind Superkilen explain how this colorful wedge shaped public park in Copenhagen, Denmark, was a collaboration based on extreme civic participation.

  • Almond & Kirkegaard

    Beyond the Arctic Void

    Swirling winds of diamond dust, rainbow refractions everywhere, deep sounds emanating from under the ice. Artists Darren Almond and Jacob Kirkegaard share their extraordinary experiences of the Arctic.

  • Sebastião Salgado

    Photographing the Pristine

    Meet the acclaimed Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado in this interview about his project ‘Genesis’ - a photographic homage to our planet in its natural state, dedicated to capturing the beauty of our planet and preserving it for the future.

  • Marina Abramović

    Advice to the Young

    Follow your intuition. Have courage. Do what you imagine. And always be completely present in the moment. Marina Abramović on what it really means to be an artist: "A great artist has to be ready to fail."

  • Marina Abramović

    How to Drink a Glass of Water

    ”Feel how the water goes into your mouth, goes into your body, into your cells.” Meet performance icon Marina Abramović in this exclusive video where she teaches you how to turn an everyday moment into an extraordinary experience.

  • Evgenia Arbugaeva

    Returning to My Childhood

    "It was the moment when the Arctic was sleeping. But it will wake up again." Meet the young Siberian photographer Evgenia Arbugaeva in this interview about her project "Tiksi", nostalgic postcards from the imagination of a young girl.

  • Carsten Nicolai

    The Poetry of Snowflakes

    "My definition of beauty is something very simple, which can express something very complex." Meet the noted German artist Carsten Nicolai in this interview about his minimalist installation 'Snow Noise', which according to the artist is a bit like a poem.

  • Olaf Breuning

    I Work from Unknown Moments

    "The meaning is me. That's it." Meet the energetic New York based artist Olaf Breuning in this interview about how he works from his gut when developing his grotesque visual language and humorous works.

  • Julie Mehretu

    The In-Between Place

    Interview with the American artist Julie Mehretu about how her perspective is the result of a ”very important shift” in her life, which occurred when her family moved to the US from Ethiopia. Mehretu fuses forms in order to create an 'in-between place'.

  • Yoko Ono

    Performance at Louisiana Museum

    In this video recorded at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Yoko Ono's legendary performance 'Sky Piece to Jesus Christ' is followed by the artist doing her 'Action Piece' painting, clearing the air in a scream and then introducing a 'Promise Piece'.

  • Marcel van Eeden

    Working with Non-Existence

    “Just like life, it makes no sense.” Interview with Dutch artist Marcel van Eeden, who plays with the cliché of film-noir by reproducing photographs with his hands, and likes how it is “completely useless.”

  • Leigh Ledare

    Photos of Inappropriate Desires

    “A projection of inappropriate desire.” Photographer Leigh Ledare talks about his erotic photographs of his mother and him, as well as some of his other works on relationships between men and women - and their audience.

  • Tony Oursler

    Collaborating with David Bowie

    “It was a very smooth collaboration. His fantasy took place inside my work.” Artist Tony Oursler talks about his David Bowie music video 'Where Are We Now', which was published on Bowie's 66th birthday.

  • Yoko Ono

    A Thing Called Life

    “The incredible changes that you go through, is life. Life is complex, confusing. The sky is very permanent, not changing.” Interview with artist Yoko Ono about how life and art are connected in her work, which she sees as a means for simplifying things.

  • Ragnar Kjartansson

    In Love with Satanavia

    "There's something so sad about Scandinavia. It's this ideal part of the world, but it's just so black. It's so fucking sad. It's Sad-anavia you know. That's why I'm a big fan of it." Meet the vibrant Icelandic artist and melancolic jester - Ragnar Kjartansson.

  • Elizabeth Peyton

    Faces Contain Their Time

    "I really like how people contain their time, in their faces." Meet the American artist Elizabeth Peyton in this interview about her interest in the power of the individual in the middle of history, and her fascination with love, creativity and the face.

  • Tim Noble and Sue Webster

    In Search of Imperfection

    "If things are going too nice, you have to mess things up, trust your instincts." Meet the acclaimed British artists Tim Noble and Sue Webster while they work on mutual self portrait, using a blindfold as a method.

  • Adrian Paci

    The Story of a Stone

    "The story of a piece of marble - the story of a stone - taken off the mountain, rolled down, brought onto the boat and then transformed from nature into culture by human actions." Video artist Adrian Paci introduces his wondrous work 'The Column'.

  • Hans-Peter Feldmann

    Talks to Hans-Ulrich Obrist

    "Art is a function to solve problems. That is what art has been doing since the stone ages." Artist Hans-Peter Feldmann talks to curator Hans-Ulrich Obrist about the similarities between cave paintings and the walls of contemporary men's toilets.

  • Siri Hustvedt

    Art is a Memory

    “Every painting is always two paintings: The one you see, and the one you remember.” Interview with the renowned writer Siri Hustvedt on her strong personal relationship with art and on how she sees image and text as very different experiences.

  • Roni Horn

    Saying Water

    Have you ever stood by a river and stared into the black water? In this video acclaimed artist Roni Horn takes us down by the riverside, performing a powerful 40 minute monologue based on her associations with water, including tales of sex and murder.

  • Roni Horn

    Interviewed by Dayanita Singh

    ”I’ve always preferred not to be anything.” American artist Roni Horn is interviewed by her fan, Indian artist Dayanita Singh. The two acclaimed artists share a love of book making, and of the unique way that photography merges reality and fiction.

  • Dayanita Singh

    Stealing in the Night

    One full moon night, a mysterious burglar broke into the home of renowned Indian photographer Dayanita Singh, and stole all the used film rolls from under her bed. This strange incident became the beginning of the project 'Dream Villa'.

  • Tala Madani

    I Really Laugh When I Paint

    American-Iranian artist Tala Madani has gained attention for her highly personal paintings depicting Middle Eastern men performing bizarre narrative rituals. In her art Madani reverses the traditional female object in painting, using laughter as energy.

  • Yael Bartana

    Returning 3.3 Million Jews

    Israeli artist Yael Bartana talks of the ghosts of history and of how you only realize the manipulation you have been through once you step outside the system: "The sense of community is so strong, that people will die for their nation," the artist says.

  • David Hockney

    Draws on His iPad

    How creative are you with your iPad? Here's a chance to see the influential British artist David Hockney at work, as he uses his iPad to make a drawing of his surroundings in a museum cafe.

  • David Hockney

    I Am Not an iPad Artist

    "I just happen to be an artist who uses the iPad, I'm not an iPad artist. It's just a medium. But I am aware of the revolutionary aspects of it, and it's implications." In this interview artist David Hockney explains what a medium such as the iPad means to him.

  • Tal R

    The Moon Above Copenhagen

    "Basically I always wanted to make art about my surroundings." Meet Danish artist Tal R in his studio for a talk about a series of paintings featuring his hometown Copenhagen in Denmark.

  • Farah, Haji & Omran

    Voices from Syria

    "Artists in Syria, they have a weapon - their creativity!" Meet three Syrian artists - Rami Farah, Golan Haji and Mohamad Omran - for a conversation about the role of culture in the uprising against the Syrian regime.

  • Trine Søndergaard

    Exploring Emptiness from Within

    "I am drawn towards something lonely, quiet and empty." In this video Trine Søndergaard takes us on location in an abandoned house, tracing the life once lived there. Meet an artist, who defies today's constant bombardment of images - with pictures.

  • Bill Viola

    The Tone of Being

    Aside from a magical visual side, Bill Violas videos are always accompanied by marvelous sound. In this interview Viola talks about the importance of sound in his work and how he is guided by a kind of 'undersound'.

  • Alfredo Jaar

    Images are Not Innocent

    "A million people were killed in 100 days under the criminal indifference of the world." In this interview artist Alfredo Jaar reminds us of the importance of images, and why they are not innocent.

  • Sophie Calle

    Conversation with the Nameless

    A conversation about "self-burial" between artist Sophie Calle and a man without identity. In this video the two artists meet for the first time, to discuss an artistic idea which they have discovered that they share: arranging and attending your own funeral.

  • Rosy Keyser

    Painting After Jimi Hendrix

    Interview with American artist Rosy Keyser about her painting 'Monterey' (2007), inspired by Jimi Hendrix burning his guitar at the Monterey International Pop Music Festival in June 1967.

  • Astrid Kruse Jensen

    Beauty Will Always be Disturbed

    "If a picture merely is beautiful, I cannot stand looking at it," says Danish photographer Astrid Kruse Jensen in this interview presenting her work: "We are never allowed to rest in the harmonious."

  • Thomas Vinterberg

    About a Scene by Bergman

    Film director Thomas Vinterberg talks about his inspiration from Ingmar Bergman, in particular one farting-scene in 'Fanny and Alexander' which has inspired him in his work, not least in his famous 'The Celebration'.

  • Tara Donovan

    Sculpting Everyday Materials

    Everyday materials like drinking straws, tooth pics and needle pins are elements used by American artist Tara Donovan, when she creates her amazing sculptural works: "Inspiration is a joke, real artists sit down and work" Donovan says.

  • Thomas Demand

    Constructing the Authentic

    Interview with German artist Thomas Demand about his work and method. Somewhere between sculpturing and photography, Demand's pictures open new perspectives on reality and how we experience it.

  • Elina Brotherus

    It's Not Me, It's a Photograph

    Finnish photographer Elina Brotherus tells the story behind some of the most important photos in her career, in which she uses her own naked body as a material.

  • Elina Brotherus

    The Human Perspective

    The human body is the focus of the work by the acclaimed Finnish photographer Elina Brotherus, who uses herself as material. In this Louisiana Channel video she presents two video works describing the passing of time reflecting her own life situation.

  • David Hockney

    Photoshop is Boring

    In this video David Hockney meditates on the concept of seeing. On depicting spring, on Picasso's owl that thrills us, on Photoshop and on why magazine images today are so dull - and on the similarities between seat belts and bondage.

  • Ai Weiwei

    Interviewed by Olafur Eliasson

    'A moment of poetry' Ai Weiwei calls this interview made through Skype by Olafur Eliasson. 'I cannot talk on the internet or talk to foreigners and that is why doing it in this way is so important', Ai Weiwei says.

  • Morten Søkilde

    Miniature Moments of Being

    We visited the Danish poet, writer and artist Morten Søkilde in his Copenhagen studio, where he talked about his fascination with the world of miniatures: "There is a figure so small that he can split a dust particle with his forehead."

  • Elliott Hundley

    A Stacked Wall of Images

    In this video American artist Elliott Hundley demonstrates how construction material washed up on a beach, straight pins, skies of old landscape paintings, wrapping paper, chicken wire and custom jewelry can be combined into a fascinating work of art.

  • Jesper Just and Dorit Chrysler

    This Nameless Spectacle (live)

    Live video performance by Jesper Just together with Dorit Chrysler playing theremin on stage at Louisiana, accompanying Just's projected video 'This Nameless Spectacle' creating an extraordinary audio-visual experience.

  • Ai Weiwei

    Life is in Danger Every Day

    In this powerful interview Chinese artist Ai Weiwei talks about his art and his life and explains why he fights the Chinese system even though he is sometimes afraid: "I don't believe people who say they are not scared, even if you put them in prison."

  • Anish Kapoor & Friends

    Gangnam for Freedom

    Louisiana Channel joined when hundreds of friends attended British-Indian artist Anish Kapoor's studio recording of the 'Gangnam for Freedom'-video in support of Ai Weiwei.

  • The Story of Jonathan Meese

    The spectacular German artist Jonathan Meese here tells the incredible story of his childhood, how he invented his own language as a teenager, and how he discovered his artistic talent on his 22nd birthday.

  • Simon Evans

    A Reality Movie about a Poster

    Artist Simon Evans is known for his imaginative works where he uses old-fashioned scissors, paste and paper to describe modern life. Here he has set the task of creating an artwork based on a poster.

  • Erwin Wurm

    Renault 25

    "No other object changes life as dramatically as a car." Interview with the acclaimed Austrian artist Erwin Wurm, who has created an automobile that seems to come straight out of a comic strip.

  • Tal R on Daniel Richter

    Daniel Richter on Tal R

    “We don’t get inspired by each other, we steal from each other”. See what happens when you put two artists, who are also friends, together and get them to comment on each other’s paintings.

  • Yorgos Sapountzis

    A Parasite in the Night

    "Art has the power to say: This is totally alive, I saw it moving. And this is not a person - it's a stone! I like to go as a parasite and take the energy off the sculpture." Meet the dynamic Greek performance artist Yorgos Sapountzis.

  • David Hockney

    I Am a Space Freak

    “My sister once said to me she thought space was God. I thought that was rather poetic in a way.” Interview with David Hockney about his endeavour to capture Grand Canyon as a spatial experience in a painting.

  • Ugo Rondinone

    Stretching the Persona

    Join us as we visit the acclaimed Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone, who here presents his pictures and sculptures. To Rondinone, art has a shamanistic potential that he wants to use to revolutionize the viewer.

  • Anri Sala

    Music Before Language

    "It's about reliving an experience." Interview with the acclaimed Albanian-born video artist Anri Sala, who doesn’t trust language, and so increasingly uses music in his video art.

  • Pipilotti Rist

    Color is Dangerous

    Meet the sensuous Swiss video artist Pipilotti Rist, whose work full of colour and playfulness. She here argues that videos can have painterly qualities and tells the story of one of her most famous videos, where a woman smashes car windows with a flower.

  • Pipilotti Rist

    We Get Used Fast to Constraints

    "So much space is just not taken seriously." Interview with the pioneering Swiss video artist Pipilotti Rist, who has formed the exhibition space into her own vision by using home video projections and creating new electronic forms.

  • Yayoi Kusama

    Earth is a Polka Dot

    Interview with Japan’s legendary artist, who has been painting polka dots ever since she started as an artist. In this video she talks about one of her works, a light installation depicting her cosmic vision.

  • Pipilotti Rist

    Positive Exorcism

    "I always think it's the only good work I ever did." Swiss video artist Pipilotti Rist here tells the story of her first art video, which was made back in the mid-eighties - before MTV arrived on the scene.

  • David Hockney

    Joie de Vivre Keeps You Going

    In this interview, 74-year-old artist David Hockney defends smoking and talks about how important the joy of life is to your health and your creativity.

  • Louisiana Channel Trailer

    Impressions from Louisiana Channel which produces videos on the arts featuring the artists.

  • Jonathan Meese

    In Art You Have to Go Too Far

    "The goal is clear - the goal is the dictatorship of art." German artist Jonathan Meese believes that art should rule the world, and that to play is the most radical thing you can do. We visited him at his studio in Berlin.

  • Bill Morrison

    The Film Archaeologist

    Things fall apart, but they are also reassembled and given new life, in an enlightened form. Meet the New York based artist and filmmaker Bill Morrison in this interview about his haunting experimental collage films 'Decasia' and 'Light is Calling'.