Anri Sala

Anri Sala

Music before language

Interview with Albanian-born Anri Sala, who doesn’t trust language, and so increasingly uses music in his video art. In 2013 he will be representing France at the Biennale in Venice.

For the video artist Anri Sala (b. 1974) language can be used to veil the truth. So he is increasingly preoccupied with music and rhythm as a form of communication among people. The conversation mainly revolves around two of Sala’s works which were shown in the fall of 2012 at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art: Answer Me (2008) and 1395 Days Without Red (2011). The latter video was recorded in Sarajevo in Bosnia, which came under permanent siege in the 1990s. At the time many of its residents avoided wearing red, and colorful clothes in general, to minimize the risk of being hit by snipers. Sala also talks here about his method. The places where he films have a specific influence on the stories he ends up telling in his videos.

Anri Sala is representing France at the 2013 Venice Biennale.

Anri Sala was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner.
Camera: Jakob Solbakken
Produced by: Jakob Solbakken and Marc-Christoph Wagner, 2012

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