Bill Viola

Bill Viola

The Tone of Being

Aside from a magical visual side, Bill Violas videos are always accompanied by marvelous sound. In this interview Viola talks about the importance of sound in his work and how he is guided by a kind of 'undersound'.

When American artist Bill Viola (b.1951) was a child, his grandfather introduced him to the distant hum of cars and the wind in the trees - a kind of sound of nothing, which is in fact the sound of the world of movement, which is a constant, invisible sound. Viola calls it an "undersound" or a tone of being. He also explains that his choices are in fact "guided by tones."

Bill Viola was interviewed by Christian Lund in London, 2011.

Camera: Marie Friis
Grading: Honey Biba Beckerlee
Edited by: Martin Kogi
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013

Supported by Nordea-fonden

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