Henrik Vibskov

Henrik Vibskov

Fashion is a fast reflection

”You can walk into a room with hundreds of people and without talking to any of them, you feel attracted to one.” Danish fashion designer Henrik Vibskov about fashion and how it resembles art even though it has another speed.

In connection with his show at the Copenhagen Fashion Week in February 2013, we asked Henrik Vibskov (b. 1972) to reflect on fashion and the fashion-industry. In this interview Vibskov explains how fashion and art are different things, even though there can be connections between the two. Especially contemporary fashion-shows share similarities with the performances of the art-world. Contrary to art though, fashion is a very fast business, Vibskov states. Fashion absorbs the world surrounding it very quickly; it is a high speed communicator, comparable in speed only with the internet. Because fashion is such a creative field, with a lot of interaction with other creative fields such as art, music and the theatre, Vibskov is after all happy to be a part of it.

Henrik Vibskov was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner

Camera: Mathias Nyholm

Produced by: Martin Kogi and Marc-Christoph Wagner, 2013.

Music mix by Henrik Vibskov

Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisina Museum of Modern Art.

Supported by Nordea-fonden.

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