Patti Smith

Patti Smith

Advice to the Young

"Build a good name," rock poet Patti Smith advises the young. "Keep your name clean. Don’t make compromises. Don’t worry about making a bunch of money or being successful. Be concerned about doing good work and protect your work."

The American singer, poet and photographer Patti Smith (b. 1946) is a living punk rock legend. In this video she gives powerful advice to the young: "Protect your work and if you build a good name, eventually that name will be its own currency. Life is like a roller coaster ride, it is never going to be perfect. It is going to have perfect moments and rough spots, but it’s all worth it."

Patti Smith was interviewed by Christian Lund at the Louisiana Literature festival at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art on August 24 2012.

Edited by: Honey Biba Beckerlee
Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

Supported by Nordea-fonden

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