Peter Jensen

Peter Jensen

The other side of Andy Warhol

An interview with Danish fashion designer Peter Jensen about Andy Warhol's early drawings from the 1950's which have only recently been discovered.

London-based Peter Jensen (b. 1969) is one of the most acknowledged contemporary Danish fashion designers. In this interview he talks about the early drawings of Andy Warhol, which he finds reflects the glamour of the fashion world, even though "one should not talk about art and fashion in the same breath". More than that though, in Warhol Jensen discovers a sensitive and sometimes lonely observer of the world. Warhol's drawings relate to European artists such as Egon Schiele. Even though they may seem naive and even childish, to Jensen, Warhol's early drawings have a fascination of their own. And seen from a fashion designers point of view, they show what the 1950's were about.

Peter Jensen was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art.

Camera: Mathias Nyholm

Produced by: Rasmus Nyholm Schmidt and Marc-Christoph Wagner, 2013

Music by Velvet Underground.

Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisina Museum of Modern Art.

Supported by Nordea-fonden.

  • Ian McEwan

    Reading from 'Sweet Tooth'

    During the Cold War CIA and MI6 funded cultural fronts. To promote the open societies agents had to operate in deep secret, an absurdity that drew Ian McEwan to write the spy novel ’Sweet Tooth’, which he reads from here.

  • Jørgen Leth

    Warhol eating a hamburger

    Let acclaimed film director Jørgen Leth take you through the iconic scene with Andy Warhol eating a hamburger from his film, 66 Scenes from America.

  • Thomas Demand

    A world of models

    We realize how the world looks through models, says German artist Thomas Demand in this interview. And we live with models all the time - in science, media, even the weather-forecast is a model. Without models, we would go mad within seconds.

  • Agnes Obel

    Diving into memory

    "Music is a sphere outside that of language. It's a different way of being present", says Danish singer-song-writer Agnes Obel. "That's why it is so beautiful to enter."

  • Shirin Neshat

    The power behind the veil

    "Nothing is ever beautiful without some disturbance or violence. That is why the melancholy of my works is so familiar to the people." Interview with the Iranian artist Shirin Neshat.

  • Bill Viola

    The tone of being

    Aside from a magical visual side, Bill Violas videos are always accompanied by marvelous sound. In this interview Viola talks about the importance of sound in his work and how he is guided by a kind of 'undersound'.

  • Chimamanda Adichie

    beauty does not solve any problem

    I am drawn to the beauty of sentences, Nigerian writer Chimamanda Adichie confesses in this interview. Nevertheless it is important to keep a distance to your characters.

  • Peter Laugesen

    burning signals of two painters

    "Artists have to be like victims on the stakes, sending signals through the flames". Follow the burning signals of Asger Jorn and Jackson Pollock through the eyes of Danish poet, Peter Laugesen.

  • David Hockney

    Lost knowledge

    British artist David Hockney talks about the hidden role of photography in art history and the problem of preserving human knowledge in the digital age.

  • Gavin Turk

    About Piero Manzoni

    Is shit in a can art? In this short interview Gavin Turk talks about how Piero Manzoni and his piece ”Artist’s Shit” from 1961 has inspired him in working with his own art pieces, questioning art and its value.

  • David Vann

    Writing is a second chance

    You need two things for a good book: a character with a problem and a landscape. Hear American bestselling-author David Vann tell why.

  • Per Petterson

    The margins on your side

    Meet Per Petterson, one of the finest Norwegian writers, who talks about writing between the lines and playing with what's not being told. And about a country that's flooded with money!