Trine Søndergaard

Trine Søndergaard

Exploring Emptiness from Within

"I am drawn towards something lonely, quiet and empty." In this video Trine Søndergaard takes us on location in an abandoned house, tracing the life once lived there. Meet an artist, who defies today's constant bombardment of images - with pictures.

In the spring of 2013 Trine Søndergaard (b. 1972) had exhibitions in Copenhagen, Göteborg, Dortmund and New York, and her work is receiving growing international attention.

In this interview Søndergaard talks about the path which has led her to where she is today, and how, at the beginning of her career she wanted to be a "real artist" rather than a photographer. But then she discovered that she could do something similar to painting with photography. The pictures became a buffer between her and the world, mirroring the world around her, as well as aspects of her inner life.

In one of her series called 'Interieur', Søndergaard takes pictures of empty rooms. The life once lived there is gone, but by exploring the emptiness, you catch traces of the time left behind. "My work is about exploring the world and understanding myself in it", Søndergaard states. She underlines that her art has never been political and that she does not want to state strong opinions about things. As an example Søndergaard mentions her pictures from the Danish island of Fanø in the series named 'Strude' - a series, that portrays young Danish women in local garments and face-veils which are in some ways similar to burqas. Of course in a way this is a comment on the debate about the veiling of muslim women in Denmark, Søndergaard states. "But it is a visual commentary. I want my pictures to be open and leave room for interpretation."

Trine Søndergaard was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner.

Camera: Mathias Nyholm
Edited by: Rasmus Nyholm Schmidt
Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner
Music: Arvo Pärt
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013

Supported by Nordea-fonden

  • Terry Winters

    Unintended Things to Happen

    In a culture full of digital images and copies, painting is a “singular lens with the capacity to reflect an individual’s vision,” says American artist Terry Winters. Hear how he applies a “painterly approach” to his work with printmaking and drawing.

  • Nobuo Sekine

    Sensibility of a Rock

    “I create works with the perspective of admiration for nature. I believe that my job is to convey the richness of nature to viewers.” Japanese artist Nobuo Sekine’s sculptures defy gravity. Learn how he got the idea to elevate a rock – and make it fly.

  • Alan Hollinghurst

    The Secret Life of a Poem

    An inspiring conversation with the award-winning English novelist Alan Hollinghurst – noted for his novel ‘The Line of Beauty’ – about being a sort of puppet master to his characters and being characterized as “a gay writer.”

  • Gardar Eide Einarsson

    The Violence Under the Surface

    “I’ve lost the youthful naivety that leads me to think authorities should be torn down. I see it as an on-going negotiation.” Norwegian-born Gardar Eide Einarsson, who is now based in Tokyo, knows first-hand how different societies deal with authority.

  • Sing Along With Brian Eno

    "I believe in singing together," says Brian Eno, widely regarded as the intellectual icon of modern western music. Join him as he humorously conducts a public morning choir with songs and spirituals of his own choice.

  • Richard Ford & Colm Tóibín

    Narrators Are Unreliable

    “You have to write about the thing you’ll be the world’s greatest expert in.” In this humorous conversation award-winning authors and friends Richard Ford and Colm Tóibín discuss each other’s work and exchange the secrets to prose writing.

  • Steve Roggenbuck

    A Poet From the Internet

    “I don’t know if you should call these videos poetry or not, but they’re what happens when a poet starts making YouTube videos.” Meet Steve Roggenbuck, a young poet who has been compared to Walt Whitman and who sees social media as poetry.

  • Gerhard Richter

    In Art We Find Beauty and Comfort

    “I don’t really believe art has power. But it does have value. Those who take an interest in it find solace in art. It gives them huge comfort.” Gerhard Richter, one of the greatest painters of our time, discusses beauty in the era of the internet.

  • Taryn Simon

    Where the Secret Goes

    Like a spy, American artist Taryn Simon uncovers the hidden places of the USA, portraying her country through its foundational spaces: religion, security, law. Like the country itself, the meaning, says Simon, is “ever morphing.”

  • Joan Jonas

    Advice to the Young

    “Love what you do. Because it’s not easy. It’s not easy to make art.” Watch as the iconic video and performance artist Joan Jonas advises her younger colleagues to enjoy what they’re doing as you never know how people will respond to your work.

  • Wura-Natasha Ogunji

    The Kissing Mask

    “Kissing can be so many things…a way of connection that is purely about recognising another person’s humanity, divinity and essence.” Meet artist Wura-Natasha Ogunji, who sees performance as a way to witness and transcend the flaws of human nature.

  • Ragnar Kjartansson

    on Stage with his Mother

    The "mother with child" is one of the oldest clichés in the art historical vocabulary. Performance artist Ragnar Kjartansson grew up in the theatre with an actress-mother who attuned him to what he calls "the realness of fakeness."