William Basinski

William Basinski

Bubbles of Eternity

Breathe, listen and float away in one of composer William Basinski's timeless amniotic bubbles. Let your dreams lead the way, or as Basinski puts it: "Sometimes we all need to take a chill pill."

Interview with American avant-garde musician and artist William Basinski about his work, and why he feels we all need to turn off the email and the cell phone, and find our way into a meditative listening mood.

Basinski explains how he works as an artist, and defines his music as ”experimental, electronic, ambient music” based on obsolete technology. Basinski makes analogue tape loops with no beginning or end, thus creating ”a timeless amniotic bubble that you can float in.” He also talks of his live performances, explaining that he is extremely concentrated on listening intensely to the music, the room and the resonance, while feeling the crowd: ”The tendency when you are under pressure like that, is to try and do too much, but you have to fight that tendency, in order to listen,” he adds.

William Basinski (b. 1958) is a classically trained musician and composer who has been working in experimental media for over 30 years. His 4-disc masterwork 'The Disintegration Loops' from 2004 received international critical acclaim. Installations and films made in collaboration with artist-filmmaker James Elaine have been presented in festivals and museums internationally, and Basinski has recently created music for the Robert Wilson opera 'The Life and Death of Marina Abramovic' which toured Europe in 2012 and North America in 2013. He lives in New York City.

William Basinski was interviewed by Alexander Vesterlund at CLICK festival in Elsinore, Denmark in May 2013.

Camera: Klaus Elmer
Edited by: Kamilla Bruus
Music by: William Basinski
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013

Supported by Nordea-fonden

  • Cathrine Raben Davidsen

    Paintings of Loss

    Artist Cathrine Raben Davidsen was only 13 years old when she lost her father. “I started making art because I lacked words. Art was my way of dealing with loss.” Meet an artist whose work is a meditation on loss, both personal and societal.

  • 8 Artists on Sound

    Captivating, agonizing, nostalgic – sound can induce a plethora of experiences. In video artist Bill Viola’s words: “like angels, sound can cross between the physical and the nonphysical world.” Hear how he and 7 other artists inhabit the sonic world.

  • Linn Ullmann

    At That Point it Became Possible to Write

    “Subterfuge is very liberating. It helps you be as truthful as you can.” Award-winning writer Linn Ullmann discusses memory and autobiography on the occasion of her latest novel, which treats the relationship between herself and her famous parents.

  • Carlos Cruz-Diez

    The Colours We Create

    “I always say that I do not make paintings or sculptures, I make support for events.” Follow Carlos Cruz-Diez, leading figure in Op Art since the 1960s, into a world of chromatic experience.

  • Carlos Cruz-Diez

    Advice to the Young

    Franco-Venezuelan artist Carloz Cruz-Diez has a lifetime of advice saved up for young artists – even though they may not want to listen. “They should do what I did: try to invent art and new discourses.”

  • Karl Ove Knausgård

    Literature Should be Ruthless

    Karl Ove Knausgård has enchanted the literary world with ‘My Struggle’, a novel of more than 3000 pages about his own life. Watch the star author discuss literature, writing and how his autobiographical style is closely connected to fiction.

  • Ann Veronica Janssens

    Passion for Light

    Step into the laboratory of an artist whose main material is light. Whether solid, liquid or gaseous Ann Veronica Janssens uses light in all its forms “to show the manifestations of reality in a different way.”

  • Athi-Patra Ruga

    A Glimpse of Utopia

    “Somehow resistance is what validates an identity. Growing up gay, black and non-Christian, it kind of is something I love playing with.” Athi-Patra Ruga's sensuous work makes us question everyday life.

  • Catherine Opie

    A World Beyond Selfies

    “I was never an optimist in thinking that my images would change laws. But I certainly thought that I would be able to create a history.” Catherine Opie, photographer of minority groups and subcultures, can be both political and very internal.

  • Peaches

    Love Your Vagina

    ”It’s most important right now that men be feminists. If women say they aren’t it’s only because the word is not relating to them and we need to find new terms.” Electronic musician and performance artist Peaches wants us to question norms.

  • Alex Da Corte & Jørgen Leth

    Eminem and Warhol

    Two American icons portrayed eating. Young Alex Da Corte, who impersonated Eminem for a year, was inspired by film director Jørgen Leth, who made an iconic scene with Andy Warhol. Here they meet on stage to talk about the stunning parallels.

  • Tomas Espedal Meets

    Karl Ove Knausgård

    For the first time ever the two giants in Scandinavian literature, Norwegian writers Tomas Espedal and Karl Ove Knausgård, meet on stage – about writing their autobiographical novels where you "have to proceed even though you feel the danger."