Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama

Earth is a Polka Dot

Interview with Japan’s legendary artist, who has been painting polka dots ever since she started as an artist. In this video she talks about one of her works, a light installation depicting her cosmic vision.

Yayoi Kusama (b 1929) is the most important contemporary artist living in Japan today. In this video she talks about her life, how her parents were against her becoming an artist and how she decided to go to New York because she wanted to compete with the best artists. She also describes her working process and how she is always surprised by the result.

Interview by Christian Lund, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, London February 2011.

Camera: Matthias Pilz
Kusama's installation filmed by: Martin Kogi
Translation: Nami Yamamoto
Music by: Brian Eno
Produced by: Martin Kogi and Christian Lund
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

Supported by Nordea-fonden

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